Of Beer and Neighbors: Welcoming Four Corners Brewing to the Cedars

On Friday, I had the most meaningful beer I’ve ever had. Most of you know what’s happening in the Cedars. Back in 2014, a lot of major buildings on Ervay (one of DHV’s borders) changed hands–with significant redevelopment plans. Promises were made with projected opening dates of 2016. All of those buildings remain quiet forContinue reading “Of Beer and Neighbors: Welcoming Four Corners Brewing to the Cedars”

More Answers

You would think after two+ years, the questions would have stopped. “Why are you being so nice to Vogel Alcove?” “Where’s the money in community involvement?” “Why do you go to so many neighborhood meetings?’ There are a lot of very good answers to these questions, some of which I’ve addressed in previous blog posts.Continue reading “More Answers”

Thoughts on being a park

When I joined the staff here in 2004, our name was Old City Park. Consequently, I spent a lot of time on the phone explaining to people the following: No, you can’t bring your frisbee. No, we don’t have a swimming pool available for your birthday party. Yes, you do have to pay admission evenContinue reading “Thoughts on being a park”

It was just a simple question. . .

Dallas Heritage Village closes two months–January and August–every year.  As much as I love our visitors, it can be really, really nice to be closed.  This time gives us time to plan, work on some more involved projects and catch up on a few things–both at work and at home.  This January, I was lookingContinue reading “It was just a simple question. . .”

Mapping the future

Highway design usually isn’t a thing that museum directors have to think about, but when your northern border is an interstate, it comes up.  In my very first post here, I talked a bit about my surprising meeting with TXDoT officials as part of the CityMAP project.  Since that meeting back in July, there haveContinue reading “Mapping the future”

A different kind of community anchor

A couple of years ago, I was sitting in a professional development workshop, taking a quiz about how connected we were with the community.  The quiz deeply frustrated me—Dallas Heritage Village is located in one of the largest metropolitan areas in the country.  Major institutions in the city routinely have close to a million annualContinue reading “A different kind of community anchor”